Debt Equity Calculator

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Debt to Equity Ratio Calculator
Debt to Equity Ratio

A debt to equity calculator can be used to compute the debt to equity ratio, also known as the D/E ratio. This indicator analyses total debt to stockholders’ equity to measure the level of risk in funding your business.

The debt to equity ratio formula and the stockholders’ equity equation are two fundamental terms and calculation methods discussed in this article. We’ll also teach you how to calculate the debt-to-equity ratio with an easy-to-understand example.

How is the debt-to-equity ratio calculated?

The debt-to-equity ratio (D/E ratio) represents a company’s debt-to-equity ratio. In other words, the debt to equity ratio shows how much debt is used to finance the company’s assets in relation to stockholders’ equity.

When we look at the debt to equity ratio, we can identify several crucial elements of your company’s health as well as its working style. If the D/E ratio is high, the company is largely reliant on leverage; this indicates that they have decided to sustain their operations exclusively through debt, which is frequently associated with high risk.

Naturally, having a high leverage ratio has advantages.

Companies with a high D/E ratio can generate more money and grow faster than they could without the additional investment. However, if the cost of debt (interest on financing) exceeds the returns, the situation may become unstable, leading to bankruptcy in extreme cases.

With a lower debt to equity ratio, investors (stockholders) fund more of the company’s assets than creditors (e.g., bank loans) do. Prospective investors prefer it since a low D/E ratio usually indicates a financially sound, well-performing company.

Because it is so dependent on the industry, it is difficult to say if a debt-to-equity ratio is excessive or low. A “normal” D/E ratio in some capital-intensive industries, such as oil and gas, can be as high as 2.0, whereas 0.7 is regarded as an extraordinarily high leverage ratio in other industries.

The debt-to-equity ratio formula

To calculate the debt to equity ratio, examine your company’s financial statement and look for the following two items:

Total liabilities are made up of short-term debt, long-term debt, and other financial obligations.
Stockholders’ equity – this indicator is determined by subtracting liabilities from the total of a company’s assets and represents the company’s book value.

The debt-to-equity ratio is calculated as follows:

debt to equity ratio = total liabilities / stockholders’ equity

This ratio is commonly stated as a number, such as 1.5 or 0.65. Simply multiply the value by 100% to express it as a percentage.

What does a debt-to-equity ratio mean?

A company’s goal isn’t always to get the lowest possible ratio. A low debt-to-equity ratio shows that the company is well-established and has built significant capital through time.

However, it could also be a sign of inefficient resource allocation. There is no doubting that shareholders’ risk tolerance must be respected, but an exceedingly low ratio may imply overly cautious management that fails to capitalise on growth opportunities.

He also points out that minority shareholders of publicly traded firms regularly criticise the board of directors because their overly cautious management gives them with insufficient returns.

Minority shareholders, for example, may be disappointed with a 5% capital gain since they expected a 15% return. You can’t sit on a lot of money and run a business with extreme caution to get to 15%. The firm must use debt to invest in productive resources.

What does a good debt-to-equity ratio look like?

A debt-to-equity ratio of 2 to 2.5 is generally considered excellent, though it varies by industry. This ratio implies that debt accounts for 66 cents of every dollar invested in the company, with equity accounting for the remaining 33 cents.

This is a debt-free corporation with a sound financial foundation.

What does it imply to have a high debt-to-equity ratio?

When the ratio is closer to 5, 6, or 7, it signals a much higher level of debt, which the bank will consider.

It does not necessarily suggest that the company is in jeopardy, but you should look into why their debt load is so high. When a firm invests in a significant project, its ratio is bound to rise. After that, the firm will see a return on its investment, and the ratio will begin to normalise.

It’s also worth mentioning that some businesses require a higher debt-to-equity ratio than others. A transportation company, for example, may need to borrow a significant amount of money to acquire its vehicle fleet, whereas a service company will essentially only need to purchase computers.

What exactly is a debt-to-equity ratio?

The purpose of a corporation isn’t necessarily to get the lowest possible ratio. A low debt-to-equity ratio shows that the company is well-established and has accumulated substantial wealth through time.

It could, however, be a symptom of inefficient resource allocation. There is no doubting that shareholders’ risk tolerance must be respected; yet, a very low percentage may imply overly cautious management that fails to capitalise on growth opportunities.

He also points out that minority shareholders of publicly traded businesses frequently criticise the board of directors because their overly cautious management delivers insufficient profits.

Minority shareholders, for example, may be dissatisfied with a 5% capital gain since they expected a 15% return. You can’t sit on a lot of money and run a firm sensibly to get to 15%. To invest in productive resources, the firm must leverage debt.

What constitutes a healthy debt-to-equity ratio?

A debt-to-equity ratio of 2 to 2.5 is considered excellent, though this varies by industry. This ratio implies that debt accounts for 66 cents of every dollar invested in the company, while equity accounts for the remaining 33 cents.

This is a debt-free business with a strong financial base.

What does a high debt-to-equity ratio imply?

When the ratio approaches 5, 6, or 7, it implies a much higher level of debt, which the bank will consider.

It does not always suggest that the company is in difficulty, but you should look into why its debt load is so high. When a corporation invests in a significant endeavour, it is totally normal for its ratio to rise. After that, the firm will see a return on its investment, and the ratio will begin to normalise.

It’s also worth mentioning that some businesses require a higher debt-to-equity ratio than others. A transportation company, for example, may need to borrow a significant amount of money to acquire its vehicle fleet, whereas a service company will essentially only need to purchase computers.